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Consider This

Series/Special. An interactive current affairs talk show focusing on issues affecting Americans' day-to-day lives. (CC) (Stereo)

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01:01:00

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San Francisco, CA, USA

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Comcast Cable

TUNER
Channel v107

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mpeg2video

AUDIO CODEC
ac3

PIXEL WIDTH
704

PIXEL HEIGHT
480

TOPIC FREQUENCY

Bradley Manning 8, America 7, United States 4, Jazeera America 3, Texas 3, Egypt 2, Greece 2, Congress 2, Antonio Mora 2, Obamacare 2, Hosni Mubarak 2, Dallas 1, Houston 1, Al Jazeera America 1, New Orleans 1, Un 1, Nsa 1, Afghanistan 1, Iraq 1, California 1,
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  Al Jazeera America    Consider This    Series/Special. An interactive current affairs talk show  
   focusing on issues affecting Americans' day-to-day lives. (CC)...  

    August 21, 2013
    10:00 - 11:01am EDT  

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♪ good morning, i'm stephanie sy, it is wednesday august 21st. it is sentencing day for bradley manning, the former army private at the center of the wikileaks scandal could spend decades in prison for stealing classified documents. and former egyptian president hosni mubarak deserves to go free. syrian rebels accuse the government of launching a nerve gas attack. this hours after a team of un weapons inspectors arrive looking for evidence of those
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very chemical agents. ♪ at this hour, a sentencing decision is expected from a military judge in the case of private bradley manning, who faces up to 90 years in prison. however, we are hearing the start of the hearing has been delayed. he was arrested in 2010 for stealing more than 700,000 classified documents and giving them to wikileaks. the judge convicted him of most charges in july, but was found not guilty of the most serious charge, aiding the enemy. brayland johnson has more. >> reporter: bradley manning was 20 years old when he joined the army. two years later he was sent to
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iraq where he worked long hours to low-level intelligence. while there his defense team would later say he became frustrated with the military and felt increasingly isolated as a gay man in the army. at some point he plugged a camera into a government computer and downloaded more than 700,000 documents. then turned the data over to wikileaks. the documents included diplomatic cables, battlefield reports from iraq and afghanistan, and this video showing american apache helicopters during an attack. nine people were killed including a journalist and cameraman. the leak made manning a hero to
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some and criminal to others. he was arrested in 2010, and held for the next three years sometimes in solitary confinement. this year he pled guilty to lesser charges, but prosecutors pressed on with more serious charges. and last month the judge cleared him of the most serious charge. manning apologized at a hearing, saying he wanted to help people not hurt people. >> for more on the manning case, and the far-reaching impact it has. let's bring in mike viqueira. mike, 60 years, that is a long time to ask for -- from this judge. is
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manning. bradley manning started out he was a crusader. he has a lot of backers. he said he was trying to expose the injustices of the war. at the end of the trial, he came forward and apologized. he said he didn't understand that he would have hurt so many people. it's really the sources and
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practices, this term we hear over and over again, that the government was afraid would be exposed by the manning disclosures. including the diplomatic cables, which proved to be an embarrassment as much as anything else. and a lot of people are believing that bradley manning did harm to national security. >> as you say -- and by the way it's stephanie in the chair right now. >> i'm sorry. >> you mentioned the video, is
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traitor. >> this sort of thing obviously takes place every day in the theater of war, but these were helicopter, and it had an impact. >> mike if you will take with me, we want your take on the possible release of hosni mubarak. but right now for more on the manning sentencing, let's bring in professor geoffry corn. how likely it is that this
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25-year-old soldier will spend the rest of his adult life in prison? >> you can never predict the sentence in a military court, because there's no guideline or mandatory minimum, but i think the judge will get close to the 60-year recommendation by the prosecutors, and one of the reasons is in the sentencing phrase bradley manning expressed his regret and indicated he didn't realize the harm he was causing. he is relatively young, and a sentence of 60 years would be a functional life sentence, so i think it's more likely the judge will be more lenient than that. i don't think it will be 60 years. >> at the same time you have the nsa contractor edward snowden with his leaks on the nsa, as mike mentioned, it is possible
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the judge will want to make an example out of private manning. >> and she should. i mean that is an important purpose of criminal sentencing is what we call general deterrence. but the military system has a very clear principle, that the sentencing authority, whether it's a jury or the judge are knot supposed to impose an excessive punishment. they have to strike the proper balance between the deterrent effect and the punishment of the accused, and the protection of society and also consider the interest of the accused and rehab ill -- rehabilitative potential. i think you will see between 25
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and 30 years of confinement, which is a significant sentence for this young man. >> do you expect that private mannings attorneys will file an immediate appeal upon any sentencing? >> well, they absolutely will appeal. it's an automatic appeal if he gets sent to jail or receives a dishonorable discharge under military law. there's a civilian court that oversees the military that will review the case, and it could even go to federal court at some point, but before they even do that, they have the opportunity to file a clemency request with the commanding general who sent the case to trial, and if he concludes the sentence is excessive, he has absolute authority to grant private manning some relief in any way he wants to do it, and it's not uncommon for commanding generals to grant clem -- clemency.
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>> so presumably he is not increase the sentence, correct? >> not presumably, legally. he has absolute authority to make the outcome more favorable for the defendant, but he can never make it less favorable. so whatever the court adjudges, will be the absolutely maximum penalty that bradley manning will receive, but it might be reduced if the commanding general decided to give clemency. >> is there a minimum in this case? >> no, with the exception of premeditated murder, or aiding the enemy, or espionage, under military law, spying, which he wasn't charged with, there are no mandatory minimums.
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they are required to consider the full range of permissible penalties, including no jail time. now i don't think that's a possibility here, but that tells you that it's a very wide spectrum of possible sentences that judge lind has to consider. >> speaking of jail time, professor corn, do you think the judge is allowed to take into account some of the mistreatment that manning suffered during his confinement? >> well, we know she will, because mannings lawyer's v already prevailed on a motion to get credit against whatever his sentence is for this -- what we call illegal pretrial punishment. when a service member is held in custody prior to trial, it's not to punish him, it's just to make sure he is there for the trial, and what man willing be entitled to is for every day he was in pretrial custody receiving this
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improper treatment, he'll get double or triple credit off of his sentences, but if he receives 25 or 30 years, getting maybe 120 days knocked off of his sentence isn't going to be significant. >> the prosecution is going for 60 years. when you look at the recent history of these types of cases where information was passed on illegally, isn't 60 years a lot? >> well, you have to understand -- and your correspo correspondent referenced this. when there is a disclosure of classified information it's extremely difficult to quantify. the risks of disclosure are very difficult to quantify. people say we want to see tangible evidence of a negative
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effect, but if you are a diplomat or intelligence agent of the united states and you are trying to development confidence with sources out of the united states, they may be hesitant now because they are no longer confident that their involvement will be kept seek retd -- secret. i think the fact that he was acquitted of the most serious offense is going to be very significant in the sentencing. >> all right. i'm sorry, i have to cut you off there. we have some breaking news that we need to report. and of course we will be keeping an eye on the manning verdict. right now the start of the precedings have been reported, we'll bring you the details as that happens, but right now breaking news out of fort hood, texas where nidal hassan has
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just rested his case. the former army major who could be sentenced to death for killing 13 people in 2009 is acting as his own attorney. the prosecution rested its case after calling nearly 90 witnesses, but hassan has rarely spoken during the court-martial. we're watching for developments on two big stories this morning. a sentencing decision due as early as this hour from a military judge in the case of private bradley manning. and the possible release of former egyptian president, hosni mubarak.
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this is the 900-page document we call obamacare. it could change costs, coverage, and pretty much all of healthcare in america. my show sorts this all out. in fact, my staff has read the entire thing. which is probably more than what most members of congress can claim. we'll separate politics from policy, and just prescribe the facts. with an autographed jersey, and obama shared a few praise. >> coach shula retired with more wins than any coach in history. each time that record has been challenged, team after team has
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fallin short. >> michael eaves joins us to talk more about that. the president was having a lot
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than the ups and downs of the dow. for instance, could striking workers in greece delay
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your retirement? i'm here to make the connections to your money real.
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>> al jazeera america, a new voice in american journalism. introduces america tonight. >> in egypt police fired tear gas -- >> a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. >> they risk never returning to the united states. >> we spent time with some members of the gangster disciples. mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories.
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this is the 900-page document we call obamacare. my staff has read the entire thing. can congress say the same? sure that stories don't escape them. >> every day a storm of views. how can you fully understand the impact unless you heard angles you hadn't considered.
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consider this, antonio mora brings you smart conversation that challenges the status quo. stories that matter to you. my name is jonathan betz. i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. >>my name is ranjani chakraborty, i'm from houston, texas. >>i'm kim bondy. >>nicole deford. >>and i'm from new orleans. >>san francisco, california. when i was a little kid, i just really loved the news. >>news was always important in my family. >>i knew as a kid that was exactly what i wanted to do. >>i learned to read by reading the newspaper with my great-grandfather every morning. >>and i love being able to tell other people stories. >>this is it, i want to be a part of this. >>this is what really drove me to al jazeera america. there's more to financial news than the ups and downs of the dow. for instance, could striking workers in greece delay your retirement? i'm here to make the connections to your money real.
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what happens when social media uncovers unheard, fascinating news stories? it drives discussion across america. share your story on tv and online. >> al jazeera america, a new voice in american journalism. introduces america tonight. >> in egypt police fired tear gas -- >> a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. >> they risk never returning to the united states. >> we spent time with some members of the gangster disciples.
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sure that stories don't
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escape them. >> every day a storm of views. how can you fully understand the impact unless you heard angles you hadn't considered. consider this, antonio mora brings you smart conversation that challenges the status quo. stories that matter to you.
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>> some portion of which, classification rules are often abused, no question about that. we have depended to a degree, that i think very few people fully appreciate or understand
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on the discretion of the journalists. so when we are talking about official media, sort of the new york times and the washington post, the responsible broadcast journalists these were folks who have in their head as tremendous amount of sensitive information, which they never divulge, because they think it would be inappropriate to do so. now we are redefining journalism, in ways that basically include anyone who has access to a laptop computer, the rules have completely changed and it seems to me that the safeguards need to change along with them. >> the president acknowledged health that there is a danger of a chilling effect. the policies that his own departments have created. >> precisely what he wants. >> but in your opinion.
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